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Moons: Worlds of Mystery

December 19, 2012

Press release and images

Image Files:

  • The volcanically active surface of Jupiter’s moon, Io.

    Artistic rendering ©Museum of Science

    The volcanically active surface of Jupiter’s moon, Io.

  • Geysers on Saturn’s moon Enceladus shoot particles into space.

    Artistic rendering ©Museum of Science

    Geysers on Saturn’s moon Enceladus shoot particles into space.

  • Ganymede’s ancient surface resembles that of our own Moon.

    Artistic rendering ©Museum of Science

    Ganymede’s ancient surface resembles that of our own Moon.

  • Saturn’s rings may have formed from an ancient moon ripped apart by Saturn’s gravity.

    Artistic rendering ©Museum of Science

    Saturn’s rings may have formed from an ancient moon ripped apart by Saturn’s gravity.

  • Our Moon’s craters tell the story of its past.

    Artistic rendering ©Museum of Science

    Our Moon’s craters tell the story of its past.

  • Our Moon.

    Artistic rendering ©Museum of Science

    Our Moon.

  • Without the Moon, life on Earth might not exist at all.

    Artistic rendering ©Museum of Science

    Without the Moon, life on Earth might not exist at all.

  • The frigid surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan.

    Artistic rendering ©Museum of Science

    The frigid surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan.